Antares Rocket Goes Vertical at Wallops Launchpad Ahead of CRS-11 Launch

The Antares rocket set to launch a Cygnus cargo spacecraft has gone vertical at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility.
Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

The Antares rocket set to launch a Cygnus cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS) tomorrow has been raised to the vertical position at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility. The launch is currently scheduled to lift off at 20:46 UTC (16:46 local time).

Once deployed into orbit by the Antares rocket’s upper stage, the Cygnus spacecraft is expected to rendezvous with the ISS approximately a day-and-a-half later. Once the spacecraft is within distance, NASA astronaut Anne McClain will capture it with the Canadarm2 robotic arm and install it to the Unity module’s Earth-facing docking port. Canadian Space Agency astronaut, David Saint-Jacques will act as McClain’s backup during the procedure.

The CRS-11 Cygnus cargo mission will deliver 3,450 kilograms (7,600 pounds) of crew supplies, vehicle hardware, and equipment for science and research to be conducted aboard the station. The mission will be the 11th ISS resupply launched by US defence and aerospace giant Northrop Grumman.

The launch, rendezvous and docking of the CRS-11 Cygnus cargo spacecraft will be broadcast live on NASA TV.

CRS-11 Antares gallery image 1.
The CRS-11 Antares rocket rolls out of the assembly building at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility | Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

CRS-11 Antares gallery image 2.
Ground crews at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility transport the CRS-11 Antares rocket to Pad-0A | Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

CRS-11 Antares gallery image 3.
The CRS-11 Antares rocket nears the launch pad at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility | Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

CRS-11 Antares gallery image 4.
The CRS-11 Antares rocket is raised to the vertical position at Pad-0A | Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls



Andrew Parsonson is a space enthusiast and the founder of Rocket Rundown. He has worked as a journalist and blogger for various industries for over 5 years and has a passion for both fictional and real-life space travel. Currently, Andrew is the primary writer for Rocket Rundown as we look to expand our reach and credibility.